J. Pedro Ribeiro

Debugging Arrow Functions with console.log

November 02, 2019

Something that always annoyed my about one-line arrow functions is that whenever I need to debug them, I need to open up a block of curly brackets. Then, when I’m done, go back and tidy up my code.

Example:

// Original code
const listOfBooks = console.log(booksOnStock); // [{name: "The Hobbit", isAvailable: true}, {name: "Lord of the Rings", isAvailable: false}, {name: "The Silmarillion", isAvailable: true}];
const booksOnStock = listOfBooks.map(book => book.isAvailable);
console.log(booksOnStock.length); // 2
// During debugging
const listOfBooks = console.log(booksOnStock); // [{name: "The Hobbit", isAvailable: true}, {name: "Lord of the Rings", isAvailable: false}, {name: "The Silmarillion", isAvailable: true}];
const booksOnStock = listOfBooks.map(book => {
 console.log(book); // {name: "The Hobbit", isAvailable: true},...
 return book.isAvailable;
});
console.log(booksOnStock.length); // 2

Turns out there is a better way, you can chain the console.log directly next to the arrow function by using the || operator:

// Better debugging
const listOfBooks = console.log(booksOnStock); // [{name: "The Hobbit", isAvailable: true}, {name: "Lord of the Rings", isAvailable: false}, {name: "The Silmarillion", isAvailable: true}];
const booksOnStock = listOfBooks.map(book => console.log(book) || book.isAvailable);  // {name: "The Hobbit", isAvailable: true},...console.log(booksOnStock.length); // 2

The idea here is that console.log(...) will always return false so it will log the data and run the following operation. And when you’re done you can simply remove that piece of code.


J. Pedro Ribeiro

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I’m a Brazilian front-end developer living in London. This website features some of my latest projects and my thoughts on anything web related.
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